EQUITY & INCLUSION SYMPOSIUM 2019
Workshops

A01

A01 • Nation to Nation Allyship- Ica altepetl ihuan altepetl ica nechicolizyotl (Nahuatl) **

 

Eileen Clearsky, Assistant Professor, Department of Education, MountRoyal University | Ixchel Bennett, Course Director, Faculty of Education, York University)

 

In this workshop, Eileen and Ixchel will share the reasons why allyship with Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples is necessary in Decolonizing and Indigenizing educational spaces. They will focus on: What strategies and tools have worked based on their experiences in leadership and community? Eileen and Ixchel are currently teaching in post-secondary institutions at the Faculty of Education from Calgary and Toronto. Both are engaging in work with faculty members and teacher candidates to

Decolonize and Indigenize the institutions. They will share strategies, tools, action plans, and personal experiences about their journey. They will address the fear, discomfort, and the uncertainty that some teacher candidates, educators, community members, experience when trying to Indigenize and Decolonize their practices.

 

Next, they will focus on How to engage in courageous and brave conversations with allies? The process of learning to unlearn and learning to relearn is challenging: emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually. This workshop will use an Indigenous framework to address the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being of participants.

 

Anticipated Outcomes:

1. To actively analyze the self when working with Indigenous Peoples, Knowledge and Ways of Being

2. To engage in courageous conversations about Indigenous issues and struggles in educational spaces

3. To develop tools and strategies to Decolonize and Indigenize learning

A02

A02 • Case Study: Developing an Organizational Culture of Equity & Inclusivity & Lessons Learned

 

Terry Daly, CHRL, CHRP, Principal, Terry Daly & Associates (former Director of HR for the Catholic Children's Aid Society of Toronto)

 

Children’s aid societies, mental health, developmental services, social service and education organizations are both service providers and employers. Their commitment to the people they serve compels them to recognize this facet as a cornerstone to the actualization of their service within legal and ethical considerations.  The concept of equity is central to their ability to deliver services in a manner that is experienced by clients as being accessible and empowering, and by staff who are themselves respected, valued and empowered.

 

Workshop participants will hear the story of the implementation of an organizational change strategy over many years that focused on diversity and inclusivity at a large child welfare agency. Lessons learned from taking this journey will be shared and include:

 

1. Creating an organizational climate that eliminates inequalities in service and employment.

2. Developing a culture of inclusivity that ensures the organization reflects the diversity of the community it serves.

3. Diversity model and process: policies, programs and training.

4. Diversity in recruitment and staffing.

5. Integrating diversity policies in union agreements.

6. Promoting equity within an anti-oppression framework.

Senior leaders and board members will be able to assess their

organization’s readiness and long-term commitment in creating their own culture of equity and inclusivity.

A03

A03 • Are your Anti-Oppressive Practice initiatives all talk and no change? How senior managers, and those urging them forward, can move from talking about anti-oppression to doing anti-oppression

 

Dr. June Yee, Ryerson University | Dr. Gary C. Dumbrill, McMaster University, School of Social Work

 

Many organizations received diversity and anti-oppression training, but this does not always lead to change. What do organizations do when they feel stuck in the change process?  This practical hands-on workshop examines how to become unstuck. In this workshop you will explore:

 

(1) The common barriers agencies encounter in the AOP change 

(2) What senior management can do to move organizational change forward, and how organizations can support (or where necessary challenge) senior managers to move the organization forward 

(3) Why service users are essential in any anti-oppressive organizational change process.

 

Anticipated Outcomes:

1. Understand the barriers to anti-oppressive organizational change, know how senior management can facilitate change, and how to support or urge senior management into action

2. Why the key to meaningful change, and accountability for that change, rests in the involvement of those receiving service from the organization

3. How to involve those receiving services from an organization in the change process

A04

A04 • What about administrators, shouldn’t they also

be a culturally diverse group? If so what’s to be done?

 

Dr. Carl James, Faculty of Education, York University

 

It is well established that most – if not all – workplaces are seeking to have a culturally diverse employee population in relation to but not limited to ethnicity, race, gender and sexual diversity, language and religion not only to reflect the diversity of the GTA population, but also – and more importantly – that of the people or communities they serve. Indeed, there is some satisfaction in knowing that there is cultural familiarity and knowledge of the people being served. But is diversity mainly among frontline staff enough? What about administrators/senior leadership, is there a necessary requirement for diversity among administrators in order to ensure that the contributions that employees bring to the workplace are respected, encouraged and effectively facilitated? In short, what is to be gained from having a group of diverse administrators? In addition to exploring these questions and issues, we will also use the time to discuss the benefits, limitations, successes and the possibilities of having a diverse group of senior leaders.

A05

A05 • Connecting the Dots: Using Data to Identify and Address Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Issues

 

Tamar Myers, Director of Research, Planning and Assessment, Office of the Vice President, Equity and Community Inclusion, Ryerson University

 

In this workshop you will learn about Ryerson University’s leading practices in collecting, analyzing and reporting diversity data. Information is the foundation for equity, diversity and inclusion programs. How do we know who is in our organizations and who is missing if we don’t collect the data? How do we know if our equity, diversity and inclusion programs are effective if we aren’t measuring our progress and holding ourselves accountable for results? Often we must rely on academic research to tell us about issues, such as in universitities women faculty tend to earn less than men or that students with disabilities are less likely to be successful in post-secondary education. However, we need to know where in our institution to look for the barriers and biases so that we can develop targeted strategies and actions. This means connecting the dots between research, Statistics Canada data, our institutional data and more. Find out:

 

1. How to avoid resistance and collect good data on an ongoing basis.

2. How to use research and a variety of data to identify areas for further exploration.

3.Get ideas for measuring progress.

A06

A06 • Confronting Anti-Black Racism in the Child Welfare System: Integration of Practice Leads

 

Nicole Bonnie, CEO, Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS))

 

This workshop will highlight the Anti-Black Racism Practice 

(ABR) Integration Lead initiative piloted at the Children’s Aid Society of Toronto (CAST). The presenter will explore how Anti-Black Racism has, and continues to manifest in the child welfare system, setting the context and need for the initiative. As well as the importance and significance of this initiative to organizationally shifting practice towards identifying and addressing inequities, disproportionality, and disparities. The organizational change management planning integration will be explained and chronicled delineating the identification of needs as well as the monitoring mechanisms established. An overview of the initiative – development, objectives, implementation plan, and progress – will be provided with particular emphasis to be placed on outlining the development, preparation and supervision/management of the practice leads. As well as their engagement and development into organizational leaders within their departments.

A07

A07 • Inclusivity Matters: Coming Out for Everyone (LGBT2SQ)

 

Lorraine Gale, Out and Proud Program, Children's Aid Society of Toronto | Charlotte LeFrank, Diversity Outreach Coordinator, Windsor-Essex Children's Aid Society) |  Andre Fontaine,  Project Management Coordinator, The Children's Aid Society of Ottawa | Kristin Roe, Manager of Equity, Inclusion and Community Development, Hamilton CAS)

 

What does it take to create services that are truly inclusive, responsive and equitable in serving LGBT2SQ communities? How do we know when we are successful? How do we know what we don’t know?   Within the child welfare system, a group of employees endeavoured to answer these questions when CAS staff from multiple agencies, identities and roles came together to develop a self-assessment tool for the field.  The LGBT2SQ Committee of the Anti-Oppression Roundtable of the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) was born.  The process was guided by a commitment to include as many voices as possible, across a variety of intersectional identities. The goal was to create a tool which would identify the ways in which the sector is (or is not) meeting the needs of LGBT2SQ communities who experience the child welfare system, and to support the sector in voluntarily moving toward equitable outcomes with respect to sexual orientation, and gender identity/expression. One of the challenges was to recognize that agencies throughout the province were at different points in their equity journeys and to be flexible enough to meet them where they were at.

 

Based on the experiences of the LGBT2SQ Committee, participants will engage in an interactive workshop to complete a challenge using critical thinking skills, creativity and courageous conversation. In the process, they will come to better understand discrimination and bias experienced LGBT2SQ communities, the importance of including everyone in finding solutions, and how these approaches ultimately benefit all within the public sector.

A08

A08 • Centering Anti-Racism/Anti-Oppression and Resisting Anti-Black Racism in the delivery of effective and equitable mental health services for racialized/marginalized communities.

 

Aseefa Sarang Executive Director, Across Boundaries an Ethno-Racial Mental Health

 

While, more than 50% of Canada’s immigrant population makes Ontario its home, recent trends show a dramatic increase in White supremacist ideologies, anti-Black racism, Islamophobia and an alarming normalization of these rhetorics. This creates an environment of hate and fear and compounds the negative effects on the health and mental health of an already vulnerable population.   Thus ensuring equitable and effective health outcomes for racialized/marginalized communities can no longer be optional, but an absolute requirement for service providing organizations.

 

Providing excellent care for all, requires system planning, resource allocation and working with allies to take up space in places where traditionally there has been silence. This workshop will take an in-depth look at the critical practice framework used at Across Boundaries, an Ethno-racial Mental Health Centre in Toronto.  For 23 years, Across Boundaries has consistently addressed through an intersectional lens, the systemic, organizational and individual discriminations experienced by its client population and the impacts of these on their health and mental health. Anti-racist/anti-oppressive and resisting anti-Black racism practices requires long term commitment from organizational leadership, courageous self-reflection, and an unlearning of existing beliefs and practices to create an accessible, inclusive and barrier free workplace.

The workshop will also offer an opportunity for small group discussions on the barriers organizations face to becoming inclusive and begin dialogue to look at immediate practical initiatives to overcome them.

A09

A09 • Loving Large: Developing a Size-Inclusive Practice

 

Sookie Bardwell, Facilitator/Trainer, Shame free Sex and Relational Health Education

 

In this introductory workshop, those in attendance will have the opportunity to critically consider fatphobia/sizeism in relation to their own professional practice. Participants will be asked to consider how they can begin to challenge the weight-based discrimination that fat people often experience in accessing everyday spaces and in attempting to access care, and to actively create a size-inclusive environment for all those they endeavour to support. Together, we will challenge the idea that fat itself is the problem, focusing, rather, on the negative impacts, challenges to well-being and daily experiences of trauma experienced by living in a fatphobic/sizeist world. Through hands-on activities, participants will better understand how weight-based discrimination impacts the relationships that those in all kinds of bodies have with themselves and others and will develop skills to support students/clients in navigating the stress of internalized and interpersonal fatphobia/sizeism and in confronting these types of oppression as they may impact relationship dynamics across social spaces, both in and outside of organizations.

A10

A10 • The Narrow View of Privileged Mental Health: Widening the Lens

 

Savitri Persaud, PhD Candidate, York University, Social and Political Thought

 

Mental health and wellness programming are often created from a medical model lens (i.e. illness, diagnosis and treatment) and from the vantage point of the historically privileged.  Further, from this vantage point, mental health distress is often seen as existing entirely within the individual, and thus able to be removed by simply addressing individual challenges, such as combatting stress through exercise.  What is missing from this conceptualization is how factors experienced by members of equity seeking groups, such as racialized individuals, differentially impact how distress is felt and addressed.

 

How can the most common ‘ways to wellness’ exclude those from equity seeking groups, such as racialized individuals?  Why is it important to consider factors such as the experience of microaggressions, social justice, and representation when we think about distress?  How does expanding our conceptions of mental health lead to a more inclusive community?

 

This session will explore these questions using a mix of personal anecdote, lessons learned from an institutional wellness program and reflection on voices speaking to healing and wellbeing within racialized groups and communities.

B01

B01 • Nation to Nation Allyship- Ica altepetl ihuan altepetl ica nechicolizyotl (Nahuatl) **

 

Eileen Clearsky, Assistant Professor, Department of Education, Mount Royal University | Ixchel Bennett, Course Director, Faculty of Education, York University

 

In this workshop, Eileen and Ixchel will share the reasons why allyship with Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples is necessary in Decolonizing and Indigenizing educational spaces. They will focus on: What strategies and tools have worked based on their experiences in leadership and community? Eileen and Ixchel are currently teaching in post-secondary institutions at the Faculty of Education from Calgary and Toronto. Both are engaging in work with faculty members and teacher candidates to Decolonize and Indigenize the institutions. They will share strategies, tools, action plans, and personal experiences about their journey. They will address the fear, discomfort, and the uncertainty that some teacher candidates, educators, community members, experience when trying to Indigenize and Decolonize their practices.

 

Next, they will focus on How to engage in courageous and brave conversations with allies? The process of learning to unlearn and learning to relearn is challenging: emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually. This workshop will use an Indigenous framework to address the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being of participants.

 

Anticipated Outcomes:

1. To actively analyze the self when working with Indigenous Peoples, Knowledge and Ways of Being

2. To engage in courageous conversations about Indigenous issues and struggles in educational spaces

3. To develop tools and strategies to Decolonize and Indigenize learning spaces

B02

B02 • Using Inclusive Design to implement effective School Improvement processes for equitable outcomes:  A Senior Leader’s lens

 

Jeewan Chanicka, Superintendent Equity, Anti-Racism & Anti-Oppression, TDSB | Camille Williams-Taylor, Superintendent of Education, DDSB | Camille Logan, Superintendent of Education, YRDB

 

As system leaders, Superintendents are responsible for creating the conditions, setting the expectations and securing accountability for school leadership that positively impacts and improves student achievement and well-being. In this session, participants will be introduced to ‘Inclusive Design’, an approach to implementing school improvement at school and system levels to close the gaps for our most marginalized students, reduce barriers and hold high expectations for school leaders, teachers and students.  Inclusive Design is an approach to implementing structures within schools and school systems that mitigate barriers for students and families whose historical marginalization has been an impediment to their social and school success.

 

Inclusive Design builds on and incorporates the widely accepted research that informs equity and inclusion, curriculum and instruction and leadership in education, serving as an integrated model with a focus on closing gaps and mitigating persistent barriers to success among Indigenous, racialized and marginalized populations of students. Inclusive Design can inform superintendents’ leadership in building the competency of their teams to affect the changes in their districts that are needed to make these changes a reality. Participants will explore authentic examples of Inclusive Design in practice at system and school levels drawing on the experiences of superintendent leaders in three different school boards. Tools, strategies and outcomes will be presented along with the challenges inherent in the work.

B03

B03• Practical Examples of How Data can be Effectively used to Inform Systemic Strategy, Practice and Community Engagement: TDSB’s Groundbreaking Work with Data

 

Maria Yau, Educational Researcher, Toronto District School Board | Rob Brown, Research Co-ordinator, Toronto District School Board

 

This workshop will share the history, initial challenges, goals, and logistics of collecting identity-based data through the implementation of the Student and Parent Census at the Toronto District School Board, Canada’s largest school system.  There will be discussions on how the data were then analyzed, linked and used.  Examples of knowledge transfer and mobilization will also be included in the presentation to illustrate the multiple usage and benefits of identity-based data along with experiential data for different stakeholder groups in identifying systemic barriers and in promoting equity in achievement and well-being for all students regardless of background.

B04

B04 • Facing Institution Racism: Understanding White Privilege and Structural Racism towards Equitable Leadership

 

Jean Samuel, Director, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion, Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) | Christian Hackbusch, AO-AR/Equity Consultant, Ottawa)

 

The issue of systemic-structural racism in society's institutions must be examined and dismantled to effectively address the disproportionality and disparity of service experienced by racialized communities in Canada.   Equity in the child welfare systems, as well as other mainstream systems like education, health and criminal justice cannot be achieved solely through the take up of diversity and inclusion, or through an anti-oppressive practice development perspective.  Achieving equity in social institutions is promoted through a critical examination of white privilege and white supremacy, and is supported by an organizational change management process to identify and remove barriers to full participation of racialized individuals within these institutions.

 

This workshop seminar will acquaint participants with the current efforts being undertaken by child welfare agencies in Ontario toward the dismantling of institutional-systemic racism.  Because such efforts require on-going discussion and dialogue, it is hoped that those present will provide constructive feedback about the efforts described, as well as learn from the experiences of child welfare to assist in engaging in critical race dialogue to end institutional racism.

 

Anticipated Outcomes:

1. To promote awareness of some of the internal efforts to foster systemic-structural change.

2. To encourage feedback about these efforts from those in

attendance.

3. To use this feedback to enhance efforts to dismantle institutionalsystemic racism within organizations.

B05

B05 • Beyond the Redistribution of Resources: Critical Considerations for Addressing Oppression, and Achieving Equitable Outcomes for Marginalized Communities

 

Kike Ojo, Principal, The Kojo Institute

 

Equity consultant Kike Ojo will lead participants through a process using the familiar image of “Boys on Boxes” at a baseball game (typically used by diversity trainers to explain the difference between equity and equality), to illustrate how the redistribution of resources as a strategy for achieving equity for marginalized communities, has in fact worsened outcomes and conditions for those communities and worked to maintain the status quo.  The workshop will provide an explanation of what equity is and offer critical considerations for achieving equity.

 

The “Boys on Boxes” process:

1.Makes the case for collection, analysis and utilization of disaggregated identity-based data

2.Makes the case for doing more than redistributing resources to address social inequities

3.Illustrates how marginalized and dominant groups are constructed and how narratives of inferiority and superiority get constructed and internalized

4.Draws our attention to the role of the system, and how it is not neutral in its impact on various groups

5.Helps us understand what our systems reflect and therefore who benefits and who is subordinated

6.Clarifies our role/ task in addressing social inequities

7.Provides organizations with common language with which to work toward equitable outcomes for staff and communities served

B06

B06 • Mitigating Suffering: Worker Complicity in the Wake of Anti-Black Racism – Ownership and Knowing

 

Sharon McLeod, Lecturer, Ryerson University and Jennifer Clarke, Assistant Professor, Ryerson University

 

This workshop is focused on worker and leader responsibility, the assessment and operation of anti-Black Racism, its aftermath and impact on families, systems and sectors. Attention will be paid to the re-insertion of race and class and the ways they intersect with child health and lone-mothering, to impact family dignity. To equip participants with renewed appreciation for how anti-Black racism influences resource management and is implicated in service delivery, accounting and decision-making and the funding of initiatives aimed at course-correction. Collaboration will both historicize and evaluate organizational cultures and the importance of understanding discourse, narrative and ideology and the continued impact on worker and service user encounters and relationships. The presentation will underscore the ways in which policies, protocols and procedures mask anti-Black racism, while maintaining and promoting neo-liberalism, Whiteness and the New Public Management. It is also focused on attacks on interest convergence and the cost of continued contentions on reputation, integrity and public trust.

B07

B07 • Dnaagdawenmag Binnoojiiyag Child and Family Service a Journey Towards Indigenous Wholistic Practice in Child Welfare: This is Heart Work

 

Sally Rivers - Director of Services, Dnaagdawenmag Binnoojiiyag Child and Family Services

 

Dnaagdawenmag Binnoojiiyag Child & Family Services is a predesignated Indigenous Child Wellbeing agency.  While we are seeking the child protection mandate from the Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services (MCCSS), our mandate rightly comes from the First Nations and indigenous children, youth and families we serve.  This presentation is meant to provide the participant with an overview of one indigenous agency’s vision, values, philosophy, approach, and service model being utilized to provide culturally intelligent services to indigenous children, youth and families in our jurisdiction.  The presentation will cover the differences, challenges and growth opportunities we have had with our Children’s Aid Society partners.

B08

B08 • LGBTQI2S Safer Space for Service Providers

 

Alyx Duffy, Equity & Inclusion Educator, Challenge Accepted Collective

 

As a service provider, you know that delivering safer and accessible community services is about combining an inclusive approach with knowledge, experience and systemic supports. This session will provide an introduction to the creation of LGBTQ+ Safer and more inclusive services and spaces.  We’ll move through the basics of the LGBTQ+ acronym to practical applications and the need for systemic change.

 

Topics include:

•Identity Basics – Understanding 4 parts of identity using the SOGIE Astronaut.

•Unpacking the Acronym – LGBTQI2S explained and explored.

•Safer Services and Workplaces – Considering practical approaches to delivering inclusive and accessible community services.

•Community Resource Mapping – Pooling collective knowledge to identify existing resources as well as service gaps.

B09

B09 • The responsibility of Boards and Senior Leadership

Teams in preventing and/or addressing Islamophobia in their

Organizations

 

Aasiyah Khan, Education and Outreach Coordinator, National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM)

 

What is the role of senior leaders in confronting or preventing

Islamophobia in their organizations? This particular learning opportunity provides an intensive and interactive experience towards a formative understanding of leadership strategies that are based in human rights legislation that can serve to inform governance and operational plans and policies!

B10

B10 •  Lived Experience Shared by Youth Speakers towards System Change

 

Una Wright, Founder of YouthSpeak and a panel of youth speakers

 

Una Wright, Founder of YouthSpeak will facilitate this interactive workshop with youth speakers who will share their personal stories of either human trafficking, homelessness, substance miss-use, being in the care of CAS, and/or navigating systems and society as a trans youth among other experiences.  Participants will hear firsthand experiences of issues relevant to today’s youth and gain a greater understanding of their struggles in hopes of transforming the approach of emerging and senior leaders towards system change.  A youth voice brought to difficult issues provides caring adults with a greater sense of hope, and a fresh perspective to bring to their relationships with youth in their care across and within all sectors. Drawing on their own experience on what worked for them and what didn’t, youth speakers will also share tips on how to create a safe space for youth to talk and encourage participants to see strengths and assets versus problems and hopelessness.

 

Youth Speakers are passionate about sharing their stories in order to make a difference in the lives of other youth and the adults who play an important role in supporting them. They have received professional development in public speaking and facilitation skills in order to share their messages from a strength-based place, and in a way that is true to their lived experiences and at the same time, impart transferable and transformative lessons that can inform and re-imagine system change towards equitable outcomes (e.g. policies, practices, programs, service delivery, etc.).

B01

B01 • Nation to Nation Allyship- Ica altepetl ihuan altepetl ica nechicolizyotl (Nahuatl) **

 

Eileen Clearsky, Assistant Professor, Department of Education, Mount Royal University | Ixchel Bennett, Course Director, Faculty of Education, York University

 

In this workshop, Eileen and Ixchel will share the reasons why allyship with Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples is necessary in Decolonizing and Indigenizing educational spaces. They will focus on: What strategies and tools have worked based on their experiences in leadership and community? Eileen and Ixchel are currently teaching in post-secondary institutions at the Faculty of Education from Calgary and Toronto. Both are engaging in work with faculty members and teacher candidates to Decolonize and Indigenize the institutions. They will share strategies, tools, action plans, and personal experiences about their journey. They will address the fear, discomfort, and the uncertainty that some teacher candidates, educators, community members, experience when trying to Indigenize and Decolonize their practices.

 

Next, they will focus on How to engage in courageous and brave conversations with allies? The process of learning to unlearn and learning to relearn is challenging: emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually. This workshop will use an Indigenous framework to address the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being of participants.

 

Anticipated Outcomes:

1. To actively analyze the self when working with Indigenous Peoples, Knowledge and Ways of Being

2. To engage in courageous conversations about Indigenous issues and struggles in educational spaces

3. To develop tools and strategies to Decolonize and Indigenize learning spaces

April 10, 2019 - Workshops A01 - A10
April 11, 2019 - Workshops B01 - B10
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